The price of removing an inground pool

The price of removing an inground pool

After the successful purchase of an inground swimming pool, the last thing you think of is the chance that you’ll have to remove it once. This is particularly the case you’re installing a concrete or fiberglass pool that’s built to last.

However, the demand for pool removal is so high that many companies offer such service. Below are some of the major reasons pool owners decide to get rid of their pools:

  • The pool requires overhaul/modernization that the owner can’t afford or just doesn’t want to cover
  • The room is necessary for another purpose
  • They are not interested in having a pool anymore, or want to sell their property to people who don’t want to own a pool

So, what’s the price of removing a pool? As always, it depends on many factors.

What does the price include?

At least, pool removal includes pulling up the pool deck and make big holes in the shell to let the water to drain. After that, the pool can be covered and landscaped. That’s the cheapest option, and maybe you can even do it with your own hands.

Nevertheless, there are lots of cases where this simple form of pool removal is undesirable or even impossible. For instance, if you’re going to install a structure on the spot, you’ll definitely have to tear down or pull out all the old pool equipment. Local legislation may indicate how much of your old pool you can be buried in the ground.

The price of a full pool removal depends such factors as the pool size, the materials to be eliminated, and whether your side yard provides free access for powerful equipment. In addition, various contractors offer various prices, so we recommend you get at least a few quotes and choose the most suitable one.

Plunge into the pool removal

Apart from the price of your pool elimination project, there’s another potential charge you should know about. We speak of the damage that pool demolishing can cause to your home’s value.

The impact of a pool on a dwelling’s depends on the location, but in most cases losing it will have an adverse effect (given that the pool is in good condition). We don’t think that you want to lose a reduce the cost of your house, along with paying for expensive pool removal. Before purchasing a pool, you should check with an experienced realtor in order to understand the implications.

On the other side, there’s a good way to pay off (at least partially) the pool removal. If a part of your pool facilities is still in great condition, you can easily sell it to the highest bidder – maybe at a very good price. Moreover, you can sell it on different online pool markets (for example, on eBay). Your old equipment may cost more than you can imagine.

Some people reconsider their plans as soon as they jack up the cost of pool removal. You may find it more reasonable to put your pool in “low maintenance mode” until selling the property. Or, after comparing the prices, you may want to “double the bet” on your pool by reconstructing it. You will only know what plan is the best when you get all the facts.